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20120701
20120731
Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18 (some duplicates have been removed)
it is in my report. >> i'll tell you how teens are using mother nature to help protect mother nature. >> in sports, we'll see why young pitchers need to play it safe. >> coming up, i get to spend the day with some knights. i'll tell you all about it. >> and we're just getting started, so stay tuned. >> welcome to "teen kids news." i'm mwanzaa. >> and i'm livia. here's our top story for this week. >> teens are often under a lot of pressure to do well in school, but that doesn't mean it's okay to copy someone else's hard work and pass it off as your own. teachers call it "plagiarizing," but, as we see in this report, you can also call it cheating. and don't think you won't get caught. >> you've probably heard the word "plagiarize," but what, exactly, does it mean? >> when you take somebody else's words or ideas and you use them as your own. >> that's exactly right. in fact, the word "plagiarize" comes from the latin word for "kidnap," only instead of stealing a person, modern plagiarizing means stealing someone else's work. now, most of us won't copy another person's work exactly. we k
tunnels, and world war ii spies. they're all part of the nation's largest train terminal. join us as we take a tour. >> i'll tell you why kansas owe. >> behind the wheel, your everyday distractions can turn into dangerous habits. >> and we're just getting started, so stay tuned. >> welcome to "teen kids news." i'm mwanzaa. >> and i'm livia. here's our top story for this week. >> scientists call them "neos" -- near-earth objects. they're asteroids and comets that might someday be on a course to collide with our planet. it might sound like a movie plot, but tyler tells us that nasa takes neos very seriously. in fact, all should. >> so, do you worry that something from outer space may crash into the earth? >> i think the chances are pretty slim. >> sometimes, like when i'm daydreaming in the middle of history class. >> no. i don't worry about something from outer space crashing into the earth. >> i don't worry about it a lot because i feel like we would have had a lot of warning from a lot of people and on the news, so i don't think that it's much to worry about. >> the universe isn't quit
, or hockey -- you should use a plastic eye shield. for other sports where you may get hit in the eye, goggles might be the ticket. if you swim, goggles that are watertight are a good idea. chemicals like chlorine can damage your cornea. >> i do track, so i don't need any eye protection for that. >> actually, you probably do. outdoor sports like track and skiing expose your eyes to the sun's harmful ultraviolet light. so look for goggles that give full protection against uva and uvb rays. >> my sister and i really love to go on the moguls. those bumps go really fast. >> hannah was wearing glasses under her ski goggles. she thought she was protected, but she wasn't. >> and then i just fell. one of my sides of the glasses that connects to your ear, it just broke off. >> when you're playing sports, and you're wearing glasses underneath your goggles, if you get hit in the face, the goggles can get compressed and then compress the glasses. the lenses are usually shatterproof, but the frames can break, and a broken frame near the eye can certainly damage the eye. >> that's why many athletes wear con
of the muppets. >> scientists say these mice may be able to teach us a better way to lose weight. >> i'll tell you about one teen's amazing journey from water treatment to royal treatment. >> drunk drivers are not only dangerous to themselves, but to everyone on the road. >> join me at the big top, where some local visually impaired students will get the chance to feel the ringling bros. barnum & bailey circus. >> so, get ready. "teen kids news" starts right now. >> welcome to "teen kids news." i'm mwanzaa. >> and i'm siena. here's this week's top story. social networking -- speak to any kid, and they'll tell you it's as much a part of their daily routine as eating dinner. speak to anyone from law enforcement, and they'll tell you that it can be an invitation for trouble. the internet is a two-way window. it allows us to research school projects and keep up with our friends. but social-networking sites also let outsiders into our lives -- outsiders who may try to kidnap, hurt, and even kill kids. and those dangers are very real. there are 665,000 known sex offenders in the u.s. that's more tha
need to know. >> which u.s. state would like to be your valentine? we'll get to the heart of the matter in this week's "flag facts." >> i'll tell you about some texas teens who share an extraordinary gift. >> coming up, i'll show you how to go from the fleece of a sheep to the wool of a scarf. >> that and lots more, right now on "teen kids news." >> welcome to "teen kids news." i'm mwanzaa. >> and i'm siena. here's our top story for this week. >> it's no secret that american teens need to get healthier. but that can be a challenge, especially because a lot of us like eating in places where food is fast and cheap. nicole tells us why some fast food can be a fast route to health problems later in life. >> i like cheeseburgers and fries. >> i'd have to say french fries. >> if i could find a really good hamburger... >> my favorite fast food would be onion rings because they're just really delicious. >> it tastes great, and it's pretty affordable. so what's the problem? >> well, there is a problem, but only if we're eating too often in fast-food restaurants, or we're making choices that aren
be on a course to collide with our planet. it might sound like a movie plot, but tyler tells us that nasa takes neos very seriously. in fact, all should. >> so, do you worry that something from outer space may crash into the earth? >> i think the chances are pretty slim. >> sometimes, like when i'm daydreaming in the middle of history class. >> no. i don't worry about something from outer space crashing into the earth. >> i don't worry about it a lot because i feel like we would have had a lot of warning from a lot of people and on the news, so i don't think that it's much to worry about. >> the universe isn't quite as empty as it seems. icy comets and rocky asteroids have been hurtling through space since time began. they're formed and propelled by explosions, collisions, and gravity. and they can be gigantic. this asteroid is 36 miles across. that's almost as wide as the state of rhode island. fortunately, most of these celestial wanderers are a lot smaller. >> pebble-sized objects hit the atmosphere on a daily basis. that's what you see when you see a shooting star. basketball-sized objects
into a million-dollar business. now she's telling us the secrets to her success. >> looking to adopt a dog? i've got the tips you need to know. >> to be or not to be... able to understand shakespeare -- that is the question. i'll have the answer. >> that and much more, so keep watching "teen kids news." >> welcome to "teen kids news." i'm mwanzaa. >> and i'm livia. here's our top story for this week. >> we'll start with a report that combines amazing science, courage, friendship, and music. it's the story of a teen who's triumphing over a very difficult disorder. >> dystonia is a neurological movement disorder which causes uncontrollable pain and spasms. >> most of us have never heard of dystonia, but jake can describe it with painful, personal details. he's in high school now, and he's been living with the disease since fifth grade. >> slowly, it's got worse and worse to the point where i couldn't send him to school because it was too painful to write and to walk around the school. >> i was in a wheelchair. i had no quality of life. i was just sitting on the couch doing anything to try to co
and spasms. >> most of us have never heard of dystonia, but jake can describe it with painful, personal details. he's in high school now, and he's been living with the disease since fifth grade. >> slowly, it's got worse and worse to the point where i couldn't send him to school because it was too painful to write and to walk around the school. >> i was in a wheelchair. i had no quality of life. i was just sitting on thco doing anything to try to cover up the pain. >> then, what can truly be described as a medical miracle -- recent research led to a breakthrough treatment called "dbs." >> dbs is deep brain stimulation. it's when they put a battery in your chest, a wire in your upper neck, and then two electrodes into your brain. it stimulates your brain to counteract the spasms. i have a battery in my chest. and there it is. >> while science has provided the treatment, jake has had a lot of emotional support as well. family, friends, and the entire community have joined him on the road to recovery, literally. jake's ride has raised almost a million dollars to search for a cure. >> jake'
gave us an informal fashion show. and don't worry, guys -- she included some tips for you, as well. this is lizzy, and lizzy is dressed a little bit too conservatively, a little too serious, old for her age. you know, it's a full suit. it doesn't really seem like it's young and fresh and doesn't show any of her personality. so now lizzy is dressed with a blazer, but she's doing it as a "do." this is actually a blazer from the kids' department, which is a great way to get a cute fit that looks young and fresh, but it's still professional, so we thought it looked great over this bright-colored dress. lizzy's dress is actually strapless, which isn't appropriate for the office, but when she leaves work, and maybe she's meeting friends, she can take off the jacket, and she still looks really great. altogether, i think she looks appropriate for her first day at an internship. this is lauren, and lauren's "don't" is a too-short skirt. she almost looks inappropriate for the beach. she has flip-flops on, a tank top, and it's a bit too casual. it doesn't look professional. she doesn't look l
Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18 (some duplicates have been removed)

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